Saida Hodžić on Global Health Governance

On today's podcast, Saida Hodžić, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Cornell University, discusses how a 2006 World Health Organization report about female genital cutting that was intended to counter alarmist discourses about female genital cutting ended up legitimizing them in the name of science. 

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Saida Hodžić's article, "Ascertaining Deadly Harms: Aesthetics and Politics of Global Evidence," was published in the February 2013 issue of Cultural Anthropology. The article and additional supplemental material can be found here.

We also hear from Betsey Brada, post-doctoral research associate at Princeton University's Center for Health and Wellbeing.

AnthroPod features interviews with current anthropologists about their work, current events, and their experiences in the field.You can find AnthroPod at SoundCloud, subscribe to it on iTunes, or use our RSS feed. If you have suggestions for future episodes or feedback on this episode, please leave us a comment to the right, or get in touch via Facebook and Twitter, or you can email us at anthropod@culanth.org.

Music

Sweeter Vermouth by Kevin MacLeod.

Additional Links:

-- Saida Hodžić's article, "Ascertaining Deadly Harms: Aesthetics and Politics of Global Evidence," was published in the February 2013 issue of Cultural Anthropology.

-- You can find more information about Prof. Hodžić's research and other publications on her website.

-- The 2006 WHO report, "Female Genital Mutilation and Obstetric Outcome: WHO Collaborative Prospective Study in Six African Countries" is available for download on their website.

-- Betsey Brada's recent article in American Ethnologist is entititled "How to do things to children with words: Language, ritual, and apocalypse in pediatric HIV treatment in Botswana."

-- You can find more information about her research and publication on her Academia.edu page.

-- Johanna Crane's recent article is entitled, "Unequal ‘Partners’. AIDS, Academia, and the Rise of Global Health."